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C. Wan, T. Fiebig, S. O. Kelley, C. R. Treadway, and J. K. Barton, (1999) Femtosecond dynamics of DNA-mediated electron transfer. Proc Nat Acad Sci, USA, 96, 6014- 6019.

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Steps to the clinic with ELF EMF

    AUTHORS: Ash Madkan, Martin Blank, Edward Elson, Kuo-Chen Chou, Matthew S. Geddis, Reba Goodman

    KEYWORDS: Electromagnetic Fields; Hsp70; Interaction Mechanisms; Low-Frequency Collective Motion

    JOURNAL NAME: Natural Science, Vol.1 No.3, December 15, 2009

    ABSTRACT: There have been many models to identify and analyze low-frequency motions in protein and DNA molecules. It has been successfully used to simulate various low-frequency collective motions in protein and DNA molecules. Low- frequency motions in biomacromolecules origi- nate from two common and intrinsic character-istics; i.e., they contain 1) a series of weak bonds, such as hydrogen bonds, and 2) a sub-stantial mass distributed over the region of these weak bonds. Many biological functions and dynamic mechanisms, including coopera-tive effects have been reported. In this regard, some phenomenological theories were estab-lished. However, differences in experimental outcomes are expected since many factors could influence the outcome of experiments in EMF research. Any effect of EMF has to depend on the energy absorbed by a biological organ-ism and on how the energy is delivered in space and time. Frequency, intensity, exposure dura-tion, and the number of exposure episodes can affect the response, and these factors can inter- act with each other to produce different effects. In addition, in order to understand the biologi- cal consequence of EMF exposure, one must know whether the effect is cumulative, whether compensatory responses result, and when ho-meostasis will break down. Such findings will have great potential for use in translation medi-cine at the clinical level without being invasive.