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Grison-Pige, L., Bessière, J.-M. and Hossaert-McKey, M. (2002) Specific Attraction of Fig-Pollinating Wasps: Role of Volatile Compounds Released by Tropical Figs. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 28, 267-279.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1017930023741

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Reproductive Biology of Ficus beipeiensis

    AUTHORS: Hongping Deng, Yunting Li, Long Chen, Shaohu Tang

    KEYWORDS: F. beipeiensis, Morphological Structure, Reproductive, Wild Individual Were Rare

    JOURNAL NAME: American Journal of Plant Sciences, Vol.6 No.18, November 24, 2015

    ABSTRACT: This paper uses morphological, anatomical and ecological methods to study the morphological characteristics and propagation mechanism of Ficus beipeiensis S.S Chang which is endemic to China, providing a scientific basis for the rare population of wild plants and repopulation. The following results were obtained. First, F. beipeiensis with pollinating fig wasps was highly adapted in morphological structure and behavior. Second, a monoclinous flower period existed during the developmental phase of male flowers. F. beipeiensis had one to four stamens and one pistil. The pistil in the stigma of syconium flowers was similar to that of gall flowers, but no pollinating fig wasps that laid eggs in the ovary were found. Third, wild individual specimens were found to be rare. The investigation found only one male and four female individuals among them. However, only two female plants can bear fruits. The remaining 9 female plants were cultivated, among which only four grew syconia. No fruit, seed germination, and seeding were found under natural conditions. Several possible reasons for the growth of rare wild plants can be found as following: 1) An imbalance between male and female plants reduces breeding efficiency; 2) Ceratosolen sp. is a species-specific pollinator of F. beipeiensis, so the gall rate is lower; 3) The high mortality of Ceratosolen sp. results in low pollination rate; 4) The seed rate [25.64% ± 54.13% (N = 50)] is lower, ranging from 2% to 70%; 5) Seed germination is difficult under natural conditions.