SCIRP Mobile Website

Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Contact Us >>

WhatsApp  +86 18163351462(WhatsApp)
   
Paper Publishing WeChat
Book Publishing WeChat
(or Email:book@scirp.org)

Article citations

More>>

Meeker, J.D., Rossano, M.G., Protas, B., Diamond, M.P., Puscheck, E., Daly, D., Paneth, N. and Wirth, J.J. (2008) Cadmium, Lead, and Other Metals in Relation to Semen Quality: Human Evidence for Molybdenum as a Male Reproductive Toxicant. Environmental Health Perspectives, 116, 1473-1479. http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.11490

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: Association of Obesity with Infertility among Pakistani Men: A Case Control Study

    AUTHORS: Nida Zahid, Sarah Saleem, Iqbal Azam, Tariq Moatter

    KEYWORDS: Male Infertility, Obesity

    JOURNAL NAME: Open Journal of Epidemiology, Vol.5 No.3, August 21, 2015

    ABSTRACT: Background: The reported prevalence of infertility in Pakistan is 21% of which 35% is contributed by male factor. Male infertility has multifactorial etiologies ranging from modifiable to genetic risk factors. Among all the risk factors that may account for male infertility, obesity is one of the emerging public health problems. Therefore, the aim of the study was to determine the association of obesity with infertility in Pakistani men. Methods: We conducted a case control study. Cases were men with impaired semen parameters and controls did not have impaired semen parameters. Results: The final multivariable logistic regression model after adjusting for the effect of other variables revealed that with every 1 kg/m2 increase in BMI the odds of being infertile was 6% higher as compared to being fertile (aOR = 1.06; 95% CI = 1.01, 1.11). Moreover the odds of having education of higher secondary or above was 3 times greater among cases as compared with the controls (OR = 3.10; 95% CI = 1.66, 5.77). Furthermore the odds of having previous medical conditions increasing the risk of infertility was higher among cases as compared with the controls (OR = 3.07; 95% CI = 1.63, 5.79). Conclusion & recommendations: This study indicates that obesity is an important risk factor for male infertility. Moreover our findings also indicate that higher educational status and previous medical conditions are also associated with male infertility. Thus awareness can be raised through treating physicians and public health messages.