SCIRP Mobile Website
Paper Submission

Why Us? >>

  • - Open Access
  • - Peer-reviewed
  • - Rapid publication
  • - Lifetime hosting
  • - Free indexing service
  • - Free promotion service
  • - More citations
  • - Search engine friendly

Free SCIRP Newsletters>>

Add your e-mail address to receive free newsletters from SCIRP.

 

Contact Us >>

WhatsApp  +86 18163351462(WhatsApp)
   
Paper Publishing WeChat
Book Publishing WeChat
(or Email:book@scirp.org)

Article citations

More>>

Lemieux, L., McBride, A. and Hand, J.W. (1996) Calculation of Electrical Potentials on the Surface of a Realistic Head Model by Finite Differences. Physics in Medicine and Biology, 41, 1079-1091.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0031-9155/41/7/001

has been cited by the following article:

  • TITLE: The Lipid Bilayer of Biological Vesicles: A Liquid-Crystalline Material as Nanovehicles of Information

    AUTHORS: Annette Alfsen, Irène Tatischeff

    KEYWORDS: Coated Vesicles; Extracellular Vesicles; Lipid Bilayer; Liquid Crystalline Material

    JOURNAL NAME: Journal of Biomaterials and Nanobiotechnology, Vol.5 No.2, April 9, 2014

    ABSTRACT: The biological intracellular vesicles, formed from the cell membrane or from different cell organelles, play a main role in the intracellular transport, transfer and exchange of molecules and information. Extracellular vesicles are also detected in organisms belonging to any of the three main branches of evolution, Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. There is an increasing consensus that these vesicles are important mediators of intercellular communication. All the intracellular and extracellular vesicles present a characteristic lipid composition and organization that governs their formation, targeting and function. This paper gives an overview of the lipid chemical and physical structure, strongly related to their biological function. The properties and role of the different types of lipids from membranes and vesicles are described. Then, their physical structure is shown as self-associated in a bilayer and organized as a lyotropic liquid crystal. The present paper underlies the structural similarity between these biological vesicles and a new synthetic material, the “liquid crystalline fullerodendrimers” obtained from the biological model. It is composed of a basket of carbon associated with a liquid crystalline material and has been shown to exhibit highly efficient properties of information transfer. Our observation stresses the essential role of the liquid crystalline structure of lipids in their function as biological nanovehicles of information. The comparison with the synthetic material contributes to a better understanding of the role of lipids for cell communication in living organisms.