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Erratum to “Assessment of Uinta Basin Oil and Natural Gas Well Pad Pneumatic Controller Emissions” [Journal of Environmental Protection, 2017, 8, 394-415]

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DOI: 10.4236/jep.2017.812088    528 Downloads   846 Views  
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ABSTRACT

In the fall of 2016, a field study was conducted in the Uinta Basin Utah to improve information on oil and natural gas well pad pneumatic controllers (PCs) and emission measurement methods. A total of 80 PC systems at five oil sites (supporting six wells) and three gas sites (supporting 12 wells) were surveyed, and emissions data were produced using a combination of measurements and engineering emission estimates. Ninety-six percent of the PCs surveyed were low actuation frequency intermittent vent type. The overall whole gas emission rate for the study was estimated at 0.36 scf/h with the majority of emissions occurring from three continuous vent PCs (1.1 scf/h average) and eleven (14%) malfunctioning intermittent vent PC systems (1.6 scf/h average). Oil sites employed, on average 10.3 PC systems per well compared to 1.5 for gas sites. Oil and gas sites had group average PC emission rates of 0.28 scf/h and 0.67 scf/h, respectively. This difference was due in part to differing site selection procedures used for oil and gas sites. The PC system types encountered, the engineering emissions estimate approach, and comparisons to measurements are described. Survey methods included identification of malfunctioning PC systems and emission measurements with augmented high volume sampling and installed mass flow meters, each providing a somewhat different representation of emissions that are elucidated through example cases.

Table 1. Site information and cumulative well pad production for the surveyed sites.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Thoma, E. (2017) Erratum to “Assessment of Uinta Basin Oil and Natural Gas Well Pad Pneumatic Controller Emissions” [Journal of Environmental Protection, 2017, 8, 394-415]. Journal of Environmental Protection, 8, 1445-1445. doi: 10.4236/jep.2017.812088.

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