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Flexural and Compressive Strength of Concrete Tiles with Different Levels of Partial Substitution of Pulverized Solid Waste Materials for Gravel

DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1101187    2,814 Downloads   4,188 Views  

ABSTRACT

A factorial experiment in completely randomized design with three (3) replications was employed in this study. Gravel was partially substituted with two (2) kinds of pulverized solid waste materials at three (3) levels of substitutions: 15% (LS2) and 30% (LS3) and 45% (LS4). This study had a total of twelve (12) experimental treatment combinations to include a control treatment (LS1 with 0 partial substitution) for purposes of comparison. The results of this study generally showed that the partial substitution of pulverized solid waste material for gravel significantly lowered the flexural and compressive strengths of concrete tiles. The concrete tiles with 15% (LS2) partial substitution had the highest average flexural and compressive strengths, while the tiles with 45% (LS4) partial substitution had the lowest average values. As to the type of solid waste material, the study revealed that the concrete tiles with pulverized clear-plastic solid waste materials had numerically higher flexural and compressive strengths than those concrete tiles with pulverized aluminized plastic solid waste material for gravel. The researchers concluded that the partial substitution of pulverized solid waste materials for gravel significantly lowered the flexural and compressive strengths of the concrete tiles.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Piaza, B. (2015) Flexural and Compressive Strength of Concrete Tiles with Different Levels of Partial Substitution of Pulverized Solid Waste Materials for Gravel. Open Access Library Journal, 2, 1-10. doi: 10.4236/oalib.1101187.

References

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[3] Reynolds, C.E., Steedman, J.C. and Threlfall, A.J. (2007) Reynold’s Reinforced Concrete Designer’s Handbook. 11th Edition, Taylor and Francis, Abingdon.
[4] Shehata, I., Varzavand, S., Eisawy, A. and Fahmy, M. (1996) The Use of Solid Waste Materials as Fine Aggregate Substitute in Cementitious Concrete Composites. Department of Industrial Technology, University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls.
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