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Magnitude and Factors of Occupational Injury among Workers in Large Scale Metal Manufacturing Industries in Ethiopia

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DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1101087    1,105 Downloads   1,989 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Background: The burden of occupational injury in most developing countries including Ethiopia is becoming a public health problem. Therefore, information that shows the magnitude and predictors of occupational injury in most risky work places in Ethiopia such as large scale metal manufacturing industries is indispensable for proper health intervention programs. Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the magnitude and factors affecting occupational injuries among workers engaged in large scale metal manufacturing industries in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Methods: Facility based cross sectional study was conducted among 829 workers engaged in large scale metal manufacturing industries in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia from February 1 to March 30, 2010. Fifty percent (50%) of large scale metal manufacturing industries were selected by simple random sampling after stratification. Then, calculated sample size was allocated for each industry by probability to proportional sample size. Subjects were stratified by working sections and those who were directly engaged in the work were selected from each stratum by simple random sampling after preparing a frame from payroll of those industries. The data were collected by pretested structured questionnaire. Observational checklist and in-depth interview with key informants were held to triangulate the information with quantitative findings. Both bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were done to identify factors of occupational injury. Results: The magnitude of occupational injury was 489 per 1000 exposed workers per year. Twenty nine percent of injured workers were hospitalized of which 98 (82.4%) for 24 or more working hours. Sex of workers [AOR: 3.32, 95% CI: (1.88, 5.85)], safety and health supervision [AOR: 1.60, 95% CI: (1.03, 2.60)], hours worked per week [AOR: 2.37, (95% CI: (1.55, 3.61)], cigarette smoking [AOR: 3.36, 95% CI: (1.73, 6.50) ] and presence of functional danger signs/posts [AOR: 2.65, (95% CI: (1.67, 4.19)] were significantly associated factors with magnitude of occupational injury. Conclusion: The burden of occupational injury in metal manufacturing industry is really significant public health problem. Emphasis should be given to provide health and safety services on sex of workers, safety and health supervision, hours worked per week, cigarette smoking and functional danger signs.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Habtu, Y. , Kumie, A. and Tefera, W. (2014) Magnitude and Factors of Occupational Injury among Workers in Large Scale Metal Manufacturing Industries in Ethiopia. Open Access Library Journal, 1, 1-10. doi: 10.4236/oalib.1101087.

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