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Development of a “Space-Saving Model” for a One-Family Dwelling Case Study of Japanese Architecture with Space Limitations

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DOI: 10.4236/jbcpr.2015.34020    6,201 Downloads   7,080 Views  
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ABSTRACT

The rapid globalization of building standards and codes in regards of contemporary housing and the growth of populations during this century demands an immediate response from designers in terms of space rationalizing to fulfill the forthcoming lack of architectural habitat on earth. The differences in culture imply a difference in the way of living, and the way of living indicates a contrast in the way of designing houses. A western house does not need an extra room covered with tatami mats for relaxation as a modern Japanese home would most likely do, as a separate living-like space. Organizations, among others, like CABO (Council of American Building Officials) and, in our specific case study, BCJ (Building Center of Japan) together with BRI (Building Research Institute) try to overcome these differences to provide better housing conditions to the world through the formulation of global designing and building standards. International publications like UBC (Uniform Building Code), IBC (International Building Code), OTFDC (One and Two Family Dwelling Code) and BSLJ (Building Standard Law of Japan) have also played an important role to globalize safety and design codes to better understand global housing under normal conditions. However, space limitations and concentration of human masses in mega cities result in a crucial new consideration: the urgent need of investigating the possibilities of rationally living within less space. Minimums provided by most codes do not take into account the space issue and overpopulation of large cities. Providing with some design recommendations for one-family dwellings has been the departure point and main motivation to carry out this case study based on actual buildings with the lack of space conditioning in a country where these conditions turn into reality.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Romero, J. (2015) Development of a “Space-Saving Model” for a One-Family Dwelling Case Study of Japanese Architecture with Space Limitations. Journal of Building Construction and Planning Research, 3, 196-208. doi: 10.4236/jbcpr.2015.34020.

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