Electrodynamics of the Electron Orbital Motion in the Hydrogen Atom Considered in Reference to the Microstructure of the Electron Particle and Its Spin

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DOI: 10.4236/jmp.2015.615224    3,027 Downloads   3,467 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Electrodynamics of the one-electron currents due to the circular orbital motion of the electron particle in the hydrogen atom has been examined. The motion is assumed to be induced by the time change of the magnetic field in the atom. A characteristic point is that the electric resistance calculated for the motion is independent of the orbit index and its size is similar to that obtained earlier experimentally for the planar free-electron-like structures considered in the integer quantum Hall effect. Other current parameters like conductivity and the relaxation time behave in a way similar to that being typical for metals. A special attention was attached to the relations between the current intensity and magnetic field. A correct reproduction of this field with the aid of the Biot-Savart law became possible when the geometrical microstructure of the electron particle has been explicitly taken into account. But the same microstructure properties do influence also the current velocity. In fact the current suitable for the Biot-Savart law should have a speed characteristic for a spinning electron particle and not that of a spinless electron circulating along the orbit of the original Bohr model.

Cite this paper

Olszewski, S. (2015) Electrodynamics of the Electron Orbital Motion in the Hydrogen Atom Considered in Reference to the Microstructure of the Electron Particle and Its Spin. Journal of Modern Physics, 6, 2202-2210. doi: 10.4236/jmp.2015.615224.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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