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Crash Modification Factors for Dynamic Speed Feedback Signs on Rural Curves

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DOI: 10.4236/jtts.2015.51002    3,594 Downloads   4,317 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

A large number of crashes occur on curves even though they account for only a small percentage of a system’s mileage. Excessive speed has been identified as a primary factor in both lane departure and curve-related crashes. A number of countermeasures have been proposed to reduce driver speeds on curves, which ideally result in successful curve negotiation and fewer crashes. Dynamic speed feedback sign (DSFS) systems are traffic control devices that have been used to reduce vehicle speeds successfully and, subsequently, crashes in applications such as traffic calming on urban roads. DSFS systems show promise, but they have not been fully evaluated for rural curves. To better understand the effectiveness of DSFS systems in reducing crashes on curves, a national field evaluation of DSFS systems on curves on rural two lane roadways was conducted. Two different DSFS systems were selected and placed at 22 sites in seven states. Control sites were also identified. A full Bayes modeling methodology was utilized to develop crash modification factors (CMFs) for several scenarios including total crashes for both directions, total crashes in the direction of the sign, total single-vehicle crashes, and single-vehicle crashes in the direction of the sign. Using quarterly crash frequency as the response variable, crash modification factors were developed and results showed that crashes were 5% to 7% lower after installation of the signs depending on the model.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Hallmark, S. , Qiu, Y. , Hawkins, N. and Smadi, O. (2015) Crash Modification Factors for Dynamic Speed Feedback Signs on Rural Curves. Journal of Transportation Technologies, 5, 9-23. doi: 10.4236/jtts.2015.51002.

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