Cobb Syndrome: A Case Report with Review of Clinical and Imaging Findings

DOI: 10.4236/ojcd.2014.44033   PDF   HTML   XML   2,827 Downloads   3,342 Views   Citations

Abstract

Cobb syndrome is a rare entity characterized by cutaneous vascular lesions and arteriovenous malformations in the spine, both in the same metamere. This syndrome is also known as cutaneous vertebral medullary angiomatosis, cutaneomeningospinal angiomatosis, and spinal arterial metameric disorder. We report the case of a male infant diagnosed with Cobb syndrome who was treated surgically. The presence of a cutaneous vascular lesion in this patient prompted subsequent imaging for spinal angioma or AVM in the same dermatome. Early recognition in this patient was shown to be life-changing, as patients with Cobb syndrome who have undergone early intervention have shown to be without neurologic deficit or have a halt in progression of symptoms.

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Bhatt, A. and Kalina, P. (2014) Cobb Syndrome: A Case Report with Review of Clinical and Imaging Findings. Open Journal of Clinical Diagnostics, 4, 237-242. doi: 10.4236/ojcd.2014.44033.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

References

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