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Museum Training Programme in Turkey: Story of Friendship Train and Children’s Education Rooms in the Museums

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DOI: 10.4236/ce.2014.519192    2,318 Downloads   2,870 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Museum education has been developed in Turkey since the 1990s within theoretical and methodological framework to better serve educational activities in the museum environment. Within this context a Museum Training Programme1 was developed to make museums more functional, to create places children can enjoy visiting, to support children’s creative skills, as well as, to facilitate participatory and sustained learning. The methods, techniques and activities practiced in these museum trainings took place in Ankara, Istanbul, Kars, Erzurum, Sivas, Erzincan and Eski-sehir districts and were comprised of a variety of content that was developed into a “Museum Training Package”. The components of this package include Adult and Peer Trainer Modules, a Museum Activity Book, as well as, Kars and Erzurum District Samples. Meanwhile it was important to expand upon the museum activities used by children. After the Museum Training Programme had been practiced a Museum and Friendship Train travelled from Istanbul to Kars and the project concluded with the opening of children’s museum room in Erzurum and Kars. This study focuses on the whole process of Museum Training Programme including trainings, methods, techniques, interviews, train project, children’s museum rooms and closure workshop.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

İlhan, A. , Artar, M. , Okvuran, A. and Karadeniz, C. (2014) Museum Training Programme in Turkey: Story of Friendship Train and Children’s Education Rooms in the Museums. Creative Education, 5, 1725-1732. doi: 10.4236/ce.2014.519192.

References

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01596300902809237
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[9] Ilhan, C. A. (2009). Educational Studies in Turkish Museums. Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1, 342-346.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2009.01.064
[10] Karadeniz, C. (2012). A Step Closer to Children’s Museum. In F. Doyran (Ed.), Research on Teacher Education and Training (pp. 229-241). Athens: Athens Institute for Education and Research.
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[15] Weil, S. (1990). Rethinking the Museum and Other Meditations. Washington: Smithsonian Institution.
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[17] Eagleton, T. (2003). After Theory. New York: Basic Books.
[18] Gingell, J. (2006). The Visual Arts and Education. Great Britain: Philosophy of Education Society of Great Britain.
[19] Grek, S. (2009). “In and against the Museum”: The Contested Spaces of Museum Education for Adults. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 30, 195-211.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/01596300902809237
[20] Hooper-Greenhill, E. (1991). Museum and Gallery Education. Leicester: Leicester University Press.
[21] Hooper-Greenhill, E. (1994). Museum Education: Past, Present and the Future. In R. Miles, & L. Zavala (Eds.), Towards the Museum of the Future: New European Perspectives. London: Routledge.
[22] Hooper-Greenhill, E. (1999). The Educational Role of the Museums. London: Routledge.
[23] Hooper-Greenhill, E. (2000). Museums and the Interpretation of Visual Culture. London: Routledge.
[24] Ilhan, C. A. (2009). Educational Studies in Turkish Museums. Procedia Social and Behavioral Sciences, 1, 342-346.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.sbspro.2009.01.064
[25] Karadeniz, C. (2012). A Step Closer to Children’s Museum. In F. Doyran (Ed.), Research on Teacher Education and Training (pp. 229-241). Athens: Athens Institute for Education and Research.
[26] Keene, S. (2005). Can Museums Survive the Postmodern? Archaeology International, 9, 36-39.
http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/ai.0910
[27] Lyon, D. (1999). Postmodernity (2nd ed.). Buckingham: Open University Press.
[28] Schubert, K. (2000). The Curator’s Egg: The Evolution of the Museum Concept from the French Revolution to the Present Day. London: One-Off Press.
[29] Talboys, G. (2006). Museum Educator’s Handbook (2nd ed.). UK: Ashgate Publishing.
[30] Weil, S. (1990). Rethinking the Museum and Other Meditations. Washington: Smithsonian Institution.

  
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