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Influence of Fe Content on Tool Galling in Ironing Aluminum Beverage Cans

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DOI: 10.4236/msa.2014.510073    3,133 Downloads   3,484 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Insoluble constituents in 3104 alloy for beverage cans manufacturing play an important role in deep ironing process. This paper studies the effect of Fe content in the alloy on volume fraction of the constituents Al6(Fe, Mn)3 and Al12(Fe, Mn)3Si and its influence on ironing die pickup. It is shown that with Fe content increase, the amount of these constituents rises that helps prevent tool galling. Trials made at a can plant showed less ironing die changeovers at bodymakers. The optimum Fe content for aluminum can production can be considered between 0.47% and 0.53% that corresponds to 2.0% - 2.3% of insoluble constituent volume fraction. Greater amounts than this cause problems with excessive constituent particle formation and earing; smaller amounts result in increased ironing die galling.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Andrianov, A. , Kandalova, E. and Aryshensky, E. (2014) Influence of Fe Content on Tool Galling in Ironing Aluminum Beverage Cans. Materials Sciences and Applications, 5, 719-723. doi: 10.4236/msa.2014.510073.

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