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The Volatiles from Fermentation Product of Tuber formosanum

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DOI: 10.4236/ojf.2014.44047    2,202 Downloads   2,610 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The mycelium of T. formosanum (characterized by DNA analysis) grown in a sterile liquid medium produced some VOCs. The VOCs were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A total of 23 compounds were identified and quantified. Among them, the main compounds were Dimethyl sulfide (19.82%), Isopropyl alcohol (9.84 ng/l), 2-Butanone (9.24%), Ethanol (7.84%), and 1, 3-Pentadiene (5.46%).

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Du, M. , Huang, S. and Wang, J. (2014) The Volatiles from Fermentation Product of Tuber formosanum. Open Journal of Forestry, 4, 426-429. doi: 10.4236/ojf.2014.44047.

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