Share This Article:

Teacher and Student Perceptions of Earth Science and Its Educational Value in Secondary Schools

Abstract Full-Text HTML Download Download as PDF (Size:954KB) PP. 1019-1031
DOI: 10.4236/ce.2014.511116    4,256 Downloads   5,630 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Earth science educators struggle to gain an equal footing in the K-12 curriculum with the life and physical sciences. The low number of students taking Earth sciences courses is at odds with theNational Science and Education Standards (National Research Council, 1996, 2012) that gives equal emphasis to Earth and space science (ESS). The purpose of this investigation was to analyze students’ and teachers’ perceptions of Earth science and its perceived educational values in secondary schools. The sample for this study consisted of 39 science teachers in public secondary schools, and 46 students taking science in those schools. The instruments for the study included a 14-item Earth Science Teacher Survey (ESTS) and a 14-item Earth Science Student Survey (ESSS) (surveys modified from King, 2001). The results of this study showed that teachers do not think that ESS is as important to the secondary school curriculum as physics, chemistry, and biology. Not unexpectedly, Earth science teachers had more positive perceptions of Earth science and its educational value than non-Earth science teachers. Students in this study had more positive perceptions of Earth science and its educational value than teachers. These students also reported a high level of enjoyment learning about Earth science and a high interest in learning about ESS topics.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Betzner, J. and Marek, E. (2014) Teacher and Student Perceptions of Earth Science and Its Educational Value in Secondary Schools. Creative Education, 5, 1019-1031. doi: 10.4236/ce.2014.511116.

References

[1] Benbow, A. E. (2011). Geoscience Currents. Report No. 44, American Geosciences Institute, Alexandria.
[2] Dodick, J., & Orion, N. (2003). Geology as a Historical Science: Its Perception within Science and the Education System. Science and Education, 12, 197-211.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1023096001250
[3] Geological Society of America (2011). The Importance of Teaching Earth Science Position Statement.
http://www.geosociety.org/positions/position4.htm
[4] Gonzales, L. (2009). Status of the Geoscience Workforce. American Geosciences Institute, Alexandria.
[5] Gonzales, L. (2011). Status of the Geoscience Workforce. American Geosciences Institute, Alexandria.
[6] King, C. (2001). The Response of Teachers to New Subject Areas in a National Science Curriculum: The Case of the Earth Science Component. Science Education, 85, 636-664.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/sce.1030
[7] Lewis, E., & Baker, D. (2010). A Call for a New Geoscience Education Research Agenda. Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 47, 121-129.
[8] Lowry, R. (2010). Two-Way Anova. http://faculty.vassar.edu/lowry/anova2u.html
[9] National Research Council (1996). National Science Education Standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
[10] National Research Council (2012). National Science Education Standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.
[11] Oklahoma State Department of Education (2012). Oklahoma C3 Standards.
http://ok.gov/sde/oklahoma-c3-standards

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2019 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.