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Heavy Metals Distribution in Soil, Water, Vegetation and Meat in the Regions of East-Kazakhstan

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DOI: 10.4236/jep.2013.411150    3,226 Downloads   5,105 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

In this study, the pollution level of Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu was estimated in the samples of soil, water, vegetation and milk collected from the regions of East-Kazakhstan. High concentrations in the soils were measured of Cd in Ayaguz 0.11 mg/kg, of Pb in Urdzhar 19.7 mg/kg, of Zn in Naualy 17.3 mg/kg and Cu in Kabanbai 0.21 mg/kg. These measured data did not exceed the National limits for Cd 0.5 mg/kg, Pb 32.0 mg/kg, Zn 23.0 mg/kg and Cu 3.0 mg/kg. The results of the vegetation analysis showed the presence of high levels of Cd in Ayaguz 0.346 mg/kg, which exceeded the National limit 0.2 mg/kg. Considerable quantity of Pb 1.96 mg/kg, Zn 20.7 mg/kg, Cu 11.1 mg/kg was measured in Naualy. In water samples of Urdzhar region Pb value of 0.039 mg/dm3 was a little higher than the National limit of 0.03 mg/dm3. Zn content in Naualy 1.5 mg/dm3, in Kabanbai 1.25 mg/dm3, in Urdzhar 1.05 mg/dm3 was found to exceed the National limit 1.0 mg/dm3. The level of Pb in milk samples from Urdzhar 0.39 mg/kg, Naualy 0.24 mg/kg and Ayaguz 0.15 mg was found to be higher than the National limit 0.1 mg/kg. Zn concentration exceeded the National limit 5.0 mg/kg in the samples from Kabanbai 6.3 mg/kg and Naualy 5.8 mg/kg.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

A. Kakimov, Z. Kakimova, Z. Yessimbekov, A. Bepeyeva, K. Zharykbasova and Y. Zharykbasov, "Heavy Metals Distribution in Soil, Water, Vegetation and Meat in the Regions of East-Kazakhstan," Journal of Environmental Protection, Vol. 4 No. 11, 2013, pp. 1292-1295. doi: 10.4236/jep.2013.411150.

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