Comparative Study of Ascorbic Acid and Tocopherol Concentrations in Hydroponic- and Soil-Grown Lettuces

DOI: 10.4236/fns.2013.410136   PDF   HTML     4,397 Downloads   6,738 Views   Citations

Abstract

Hydroponically-grown produce may be a way of helping to feed the world a variety of fruits and vegetables, regardless of soil quality, space availability or climate. The objective of this study was to determine whether hydroponicallygrown lettuce contains as much ascorbic acid and tocopherol as soil-grown lettuce. We analyzed four varieties of lettuce, including: Waldmann’s Dark Green, Red Lollo Antago, Red Romaine Annapolis, and Butterleaf. The tocopherol content of hydroponically-grown Waldmann’s Dark Green, Red Lollo Antago, and Red Romaine Annapolis was 229%, 497% and 492% higher, respectively, compared to their soil-grown counterpart. The ascorbic acid content of hydroponically-grown Waldmann’s Dark Green, Red Lollo Antago, and Red Romaine Annapolis was 93%, 171% and 216% higher, respectively, compared to their soil-grown counterparts. Hydroponically grown lettuce varieties are significantly higher in both ascorbic acid and tocopherol content than their soil-grown counterparts, and hydroponic gardening is a viable option for producing nutritious fruits and vegetables.

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D. Buchanan and S. Omaye, "Comparative Study of Ascorbic Acid and Tocopherol Concentrations in Hydroponic- and Soil-Grown Lettuces," Food and Nutrition Sciences, Vol. 4 No. 10, 2013, pp. 1047-1053. doi: 10.4236/fns.2013.410136.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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