Tracking Microorganisms in Production and Sale Operations of Spiced Geese

DOI: 10.4236/fns.2013.49123   PDF   HTML     3,332 Downloads   4,439 Views   Citations

Abstract

Cooling, transportation and sale processes of spiced geese were studied, eight spiced geese meat samples with different sampling time, Airborne microorganism samples of three different workplaces and five different environmental contact substance samples were test, measures of special mediums, biochemical identification and DNA sequencing were carried out, then Escherichia coli, Yeast, Mildew, Lactic acid bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Janthinobacterium were detected. For spiced geese meat samples, microorganisms were significant (p < 0.05) increased with the prolong of sampling time. Lactic acid bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Janthinobacterium were detected in each processing operation and the total aerobic counts of each sample was increased or significant (p < 0.05) increased with the prolong of sampling time; Escherichia coli, Yeast and Mildew were detected on samples entered into the retail outlet mainly and the total aerobic counts of each sample was increased or significant (p < 0.05) increased also. In the household workshop, Mildew and Janthinobacterium were the superior microorganisms. In the transport vehicle, Staphylococcus aureus and Janthinobacterium were the superior microorganisms; Staphylococcus aureus was the superior microorganism in the retail outlet. For environmental contact substances, Cooling platform, pallet, chopping block were the most serious contaminated environmental contact substances and the total bacteria counts were significant (p < 0.05) more than stainless steel barrel and chopper; Janthinobacterium was the superior microorganism on pallet, stainless steel barrel and chopper; Lactic acid bacteria was the superior microorganism on chopping block and stainless steel barrel; Staphylococcus aureus was the superior microorganism on cooling platform. Findings indicate that Escherichia coli, Yeast, Mildew, Lactic acid bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Janthinobacterium were the main microorganisms; Household workshop and the retail outlet were the main place microorganisms contaminated; Pallet, stainless steel barrel and chopper were the main environmental contact substances.

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H. Xie, L. Bu, Z. Zhong, Y. Zhang, J. Lin and Z. Li, "Tracking Microorganisms in Production and Sale Operations of Spiced Geese," Food and Nutrition Sciences, Vol. 4 No. 9, 2013, pp. 950-955. doi: 10.4236/fns.2013.49123.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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