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Evaluation of Central Nervous System Acting Effects of Plant-Derived Essential Oils Using Ambulatory Activity in Mice

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DOI: 10.4236/pp.2013.42023    5,014 Downloads   9,883 Views   Citations
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ABSTRACT

Although plant-derived essential oils (EOs) have traditionally been used for treating various kinds of mental disorders, their Central Nervous System (CNS) acting effects have not yet been clarified well. The present study examined effects of 30 kinds of EOs on ambulatory activity, a kind of spontaneous motor activity, in ICR mice. Nineteen kinds of them did not produce any significant effects on the ambulatory activity of mice. Although effects of EOs of lavender, jasmine and neroli on the activity were statistically significant, their CNS acting properties remained unclear. EOs of peppermint, chamomile, thyme, tea tree, rosemary and basil significantly increased the ambulatory activity of mice as well as CNS stimulants, suggesting that they possess CNS stimulant-like effects. In contrast, an EO of myrtle significantly decreased the activity as well as CNS depressants, suggesting that it possesses a CNS depressant-like effect. An EO of palmarosa significantly increased the activity at a lower dose and decreased at a higher dose as well as some kinds of CNS depressants such as ethanol, suggesting that it also possesses a CNS depressant-like effect. These 8 kinds of EOs might be useful for treating some kinds of mental troubles and/or symptoms through their CNS acting effects.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

T. Umezu, "Evaluation of Central Nervous System Acting Effects of Plant-Derived Essential Oils Using Ambulatory Activity in Mice," Pharmacology & Pharmacy, Vol. 4 No. 2, 2013, pp. 160-170. doi: 10.4236/pp.2013.42023.

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