Statistical Modeling of Pin Gauge Dimensions of Root of Gas Turbine Blade in Creep Feed Grinding Process

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DOI: 10.4236/eng.2010.28081    6,925 Downloads   10,794 Views  

ABSTRACT

Creep feed grinding is a recently invented process of material handling. It combines high quality of the piece surface, productivity, and the possibility of automatic control. The main objectives of this research is to study the influences of major process parameters and their interactions of creep feed grinding process such as wheel speed, workpiece speed, grinding depth, and dresser speed on the pin gauge dimensions of root of gas turbine blade by design of experiments (DOE). Experimental results are analyzed by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and empirical models of pin gauge dimensions of root are developed. The study found that higher wheel speed along with slower workpiece speed, lower grinding depth and higher dresser speed, cause to obtain best conditions for pin gauge dimensions of root.

Cite this paper

A. Fazeli, "Statistical Modeling of Pin Gauge Dimensions of Root of Gas Turbine Blade in Creep Feed Grinding Process," Engineering, Vol. 2 No. 8, 2010, pp. 635-640. doi: 10.4236/eng.2010.28081.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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