The Use of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy As a Substitute for Blood Pressure Monitoring in a Patient with Severe Osteogenesis Imperfecta

DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2012.24044   PDF   HTML     4,371 Downloads   6,723 Views  

Abstract

The use of near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) as a means of assessing regional oxygen supply is a method that has gained recent support and interest. Given the potential of NIRS, this technology was utilized in an infant patient with a case of severe osteogenesis imperfecta that precluded conventional blood pressure monitoring. Using NIRS as a monitor and titrating the anesthetic accordingly produced a good outcome, with no post-operative evidence of detrimental intra-operative hypotension or ischemia.

Share and Cite:

J. Dilley, E. Abraham and T. Sangari, "The Use of Near-Infrared Spectroscopy As a Substitute for Blood Pressure Monitoring in a Patient with Severe Osteogenesis Imperfecta," Open Journal of Anesthesiology, Vol. 2 No. 4, 2012, pp. 195-197. doi: 10.4236/ojanes.2012.24044.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

References

[1] A. Konishi and K. Kikuchi, “Cerebral Oxygen Saturation (rSO2) during Open Heart Surgery and Postoperative Brain Dysfunction,” Masui, Vol. 44, No. 10, 1995, pp. 1322-1326.
[2] T. Higami, S. Kozawa, T. Asada, et al., “Retrograde Cerebral Perfusion versus Selective Cerebral Perfusion as Evaluated by Cerebral Oxygen Saturation during Aortic Arch Reconstruction,” The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, Vol. 67, No. 4, 1999, pp. 1091-1096. doi:10.1016/S0003-4975(99)00135-6
[3] S. K. Samra, E. A. Dy, K. Welch, et al., “Evaluation of a Cerebral Oximeter as a Monitor of Cerebral Ischemia during Carotid Endarterectomy,” Anesthesiology, Vol. 93, No. 4, 2000, pp. 964-970. doi:10.1097/00000542-200010000-00015
[4] A. Casati, G. Fanelli, P. Pietropaoli, R. Proietti, R. Tufano, G. Danelli, G. Fierro, G. De Cosmo and G. Servillo, “Continuous Monitoring of Cerebral Oxygen Saturation in Elderly Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Surgery Minimizes Brain Exposure to Potential Hypoxia,” Anesthesia & Analgesia, Vol. 101, No. 3, 2005, pp. 740-747. doi:10.1213/01.ane.0000166974.96219.cd
[5] F. F. Jobsis, “Noninvasive, Infrared Monitoring of Cerebral and Myocardial Oxygen Sufficiency and Circulatory Parameters,” Science, Vol. 198, No. 4323, 1977, pp. 12641267. doi:10.1126/science.929199
[6] J. M. Murkin and M. Arango, “Near-Infrared Spectroscopy as an Index of Brain and Tissue Oxygenation,” British Journal of Anaesthesia, Vol. 103, No. 1, 2009, pp. i3i13.

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2020 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.