Mealtime feeding behaviors and gastrointestinal dysfunction in children with classic autism compared with normal sibling controls

Abstract

Introduction: We compared the frequency and duration of specific mealtime behaviors and GI dysfunction in children with classic autism to typically-developing siblings. Survey Method: A 41-item on-line parent survey. Statistics: Chi square and binomial logistical regression. Results: 79 children with classic autism matched with a normally-developing sibling. Logistic Regression Analysis Revealed: Dislike of new foods and bizarre mealtime mannerisms, were more frequent in those with classic autism (p < 0.01). They also had higher odds ratio of constipation and fecal incontinence (p < 0.01). 40% of children with classic autism had been on GFCF diets (p < 0.01). Only 1% of those children on a gluten-free diet had a biopsy-proven diagnosis of celiac disease. Conclusion: Children with classic autism had more frequent dislike of new foods, bizarre mealtime behaviors, constipation, and fecal incontinence.

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Badalyan, V. and Schwartz, R. (2012) Mealtime feeding behaviors and gastrointestinal dysfunction in children with classic autism compared with normal sibling controls. Open Journal of Pediatrics, 2, 150-160. doi: 10.4236/ojped.2012.22025.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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