A Pastiche of Outcomes for a Teacher-Student Pair: Experiences within a Reading Cluster Group

DOI: 10.4236/ce.2012.31010   PDF   HTML     4,689 Downloads   7,644 Views   Citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to understand the lived experiences of two individuals involved in Project CLUE (Clustering Learners Unlocks Equity), a university-school collaboration. One former third grade teacher (T) and one of her former students (S) participated in this study. A phenomenological case study design was used. T and S were interviewed using a semi-structured interview protocol. The research question that drove the present study was: What are the impacts of a gifted reading curriculum on students within a gifted cluster inside a regular classroom? Three salient themes from an analysis of the interview transcripts emerged. They were: 1) social and affective outcomes, 2) bidirectional motivation for deep learning and exploration, and 3) obstacles to implementation.

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Miller, A. , Latz, A. , Jenkins, S. & Adams, C. (2012). A Pastiche of Outcomes for a Teacher-Student Pair: Experiences within a Reading Cluster Group. Creative Education, 3, 61-66. doi: 10.4236/ce.2012.31010.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

References

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