Creative Education

Volume 8, Issue 9 (July 2017)

ISSN Print: 2151-4755   ISSN Online: 2151-4771

Google-based Impact Factor: 1.01  Citations  h5-index & Ranking

Animated Videos Prove to be Beneficial in Teaching English Grammar as EFL: A Neurological Study of How Students Learn and Retain English Grammar

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DOI: 10.4236/ce.2017.89099    1,593 Downloads   3,967 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

In the education field, there are different theories that apply to teaching in general and specific ones targeting mode of teaching English grammar as a foreign language. This study involves neurological evidence through using animation videos which promotes the idea that learning and teaching in an enjoyable environment are much more conducive, than learning in an unpleasant environment. Using animated videos presentations in teaching students English grammar by explaining the English grammar rules, the used videos required too much attention in learning specific words such as “use of conjunctions” and “verbs” in a humorous and economical way. The study targeted 9 students of the fourth grade at an EFL environment and the sample included only a public school of different achieving levels. Finally, the results of the analysis indicate that this technique helped students of fourth graders to memorize the rules in an easier way. The students also felt happy of seeing animation videos as a way of learning English grammar which suggests that students indeed retain much more when learning through animated videos than when learning in a traditional manner (through drills, grammar exercises from a workbook). The study findings support that the educational pedagogy is applicable to language theory as well. It promotes the idea that students of younger ages should be provided with the opportunities to engage in animated videos in order to enhance the learning process.

Cite this paper

Abdo, I. and Al-Awabdeh, A. (2017) Animated Videos Prove to be Beneficial in Teaching English Grammar as EFL: A Neurological Study of How Students Learn and Retain English Grammar. Creative Education, 8, 1415-1423. doi: 10.4236/ce.2017.89099.

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