Psychology

Volume 7, Issue 7 (July 2016)

ISSN Print: 2152-7180   ISSN Online: 2152-7199

Google-based Impact Factor: 1.37  Citations  

The Possibility of Self-Determined Death Eliminates Mortality Salience Effects on Cultural Worldview Defense: Cross-Cultural Replications

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DOI: 10.4236/psych.2016.77101    1,596 Downloads   2,628 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Contemplating the inevitability of one’s own death can deeply affect a person’s subjective sense of control, eliciting symbolic responses to restore control through cultural worldview defense. Re-search supporting this perspective has shown that reminders of one’s own death (i.e., uncontrol-lable death) can increase worldview defense, whereas self-determined dying (i.e., controllable death) does not (Fritsche, Jonas, & Fankhänel, 2008). To date, all supportive evidence comes from the German culture and it remains unclear whether this effect can be replicated in non-German cultures. We conducted two studies to investigate the cross-cultural validity of this effect and rep-licated the effect in both a highly individualistic culture (i.e., the United States) and a highly collec-tivistic culture (i.e., China). The increased ingroup identification observed after reminders of un-controllable death supports the model of group-based control.

Cite this paper

Du, H. , Fritsche, I. , Talati, Z. , Castano, E. and Jonas, E. (2016) The Possibility of Self-Determined Death Eliminates Mortality Salience Effects on Cultural Worldview Defense: Cross-Cultural Replications. Psychology, 7, 1004-1014. doi: 10.4236/psych.2016.77101.

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