Socio-Emotional Status, Education, and Time-Discounting in Japanese Non-Smoking Population: A Multi-Generational Study

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DOI: 10.4236/psych.2013.42018   PDF   HTML     4,681 Downloads   7,688 Views   Citations

Abstract

Recent studies in behavioral economics and neuroeconomics have revealed that emotion affects impulsivity in intertemporal choice. We examined the roles of socio-emotional status (i.e., perceived stress, depression, quality of sleep, loneliness) in temporal discounting behavior by Japanese non-smokers in a generation-specific manner (20 - 70 s) with a relatively large sample size (N = 3450). We observed that 1) both men and women are the most impulsive in their 60 s; 2) education has a negative impact on impulsivity in men aged 40 - 49 and women aged 50 - 59; 3) perceived stress has a negative impact on impulsivity in men aged 60 - 69; and 4) sleeplessness has negative and positive impacts on impulsivity in men aged 40 - 49 and women aged 30 - 39, respectively. Biological and social factors underlying observed findings are discussed.


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Yamane, S. , Takahashi, T. , Kamesaka, A. , Tsutsui, Y. & Ohtake, F. (2013). Socio-Emotional Status, Education, and Time-Discounting in Japanese Non-Smoking Population: A Multi-Generational Study. Psychology, 4, 124-132. doi: 10.4236/psych.2013.42018.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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