Marcus-Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome and Gustatory Sweating in Long Standing Poorly Controlled Diabetes: A Case Report

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DOI: 10.4236/ijcm.2012.31008   PDF   HTML   XML   4,519 Downloads   7,402 Views   Citations

Abstract

Introduction: Marcus Gunn jaw winking syndrome (MGJWS) is a rare congenital disorder belonging to the synkinetic eye movement group of disorders observed in children. It occurrence in adults and patients with diabetes has not been reported. Material and Methods: A 64 year man with poorly controlled diabetes of 18 years presented with 3 month history of jaw winking on the left side along with gustatory sweating, which was managed conservatively. There was spontaneous improvement in jaw wink at 4 months of follow up. Conclusions: Acquired causes of MGJWS are not known. This is probably the first report of this syndrome occurring at such a late age. Long standing poorly controlled diabetes may have had some role in the development of jaw winking in this patient.

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D. Dutta, I. Maisnam, S. Ghosh, P. Mukhopadhyay, S. Mukhopadhyay and S. Chowdhury, "Marcus-Gunn Jaw Winking Syndrome and Gustatory Sweating in Long Standing Poorly Controlled Diabetes: A Case Report," International Journal of Clinical Medicine, Vol. 3 No. 1, 2012, pp. 40-42. doi: 10.4236/ijcm.2012.31008.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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