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The Impact of Television on Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors among Teenagers, Ages 15 - 17 Years Old, in the City of Klina, Kosovo

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DOI: 10.4236/psych.2015.66068    4,250 Downloads   5,341 Views   Citations
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ABSTRACT

Sexual content on television has been shown to have significant impacts on sexual attitudes and behaviours of people, especially among teenagers. Consequently, numerous studies have been conducted over the last decade to examine the connection among these areas, among other goals. Also, it is an attempt to analyze the connection between sexual attitudes and behaviours of teens and sexual content on television, as well as the dissatisfaction created, as a result of the high levels of these contents. 80 students were included in this study, conveniently selected from three schools in the city of Klina. The hypothesis is that portrayals of sex on television lead adolescents to sexual relationships. In addition, high levels of sexual content push teens to dissatisfaction with their sexual experiences. From the obtained results, it is concluded that, although TV provides consid-erable levels of sexual content, it does not encourage teenagers to early sexual intercourse, but if TV shows such content in high levels, then teenagers can be disappointed with their experience and have health as well as social problems.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Borinca, I. (2015). The Impact of Television on Sexual Attitudes and Behaviors among Teenagers, Ages 15 - 17 Years Old, in the City of Klina, Kosovo. Psychology, 6, 700-707. doi: 10.4236/psych.2015.66068.

References

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2003-1065-L
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http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2006.00125.x
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[28] Brown, J. (2006). Sexy Media Matter: Exposure to Sexual Content in Music, Movies, Television, and Magazine Predicts Black and White Adolescents’ Sexual Behaviour. Pediatrics, 117, 1018-1027.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/117/4/1018.full.html
[29] Chapin, J. R. (2000). Adolescent Sex and Mass Media: A Developmental Approach. Adolescence, 35, 799-811.
[30] Collins, L., Elliott, N., & Rat, A. (2003). Linking Media Content to Media Effects: The RAND Television and Adolescent Sexuality (TAS) Study. In D. Kunkel, A. Jordan, J. Manganello, & M. Fishbein (Eds.), Media Messages and Public Health: A Decisions Approach to Content Analysis. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
[31] Collins, R. L., Elliott, M. N, Berry, S. H., Kanouse, D. E., Kunkel, D., Hunter, S. B., & Miu, A. (2004). Watching Sex on Television Predicts Adolescent Initiation of Sexual Behaviour. Pediatrics, 114, 280-289.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1542/peds.2003-1065-L
[32] Conbrach, L. J. (1951). Coefficient Alpha and Internal Structure of Tests. Psychometrika, 16, 297-334.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02310555
[33] Dacey, J., & Kenny, M. (1997). Adolescent Development (2nd ed). Boston: McGraw-Hill.
[34] Harris, R. J. (1994). A Congnitive Psychology of Mass Communication. Hillsdale, New Jersey: Lawerence Erlbaum.
[35] Haxhiymeri, E., & Gjermeni, E. (1997). Sterotypes and Gender Roles. Tirane.
[36] Huston, A. C., Wartella, E., & Donnerstine, E. (1998). Measuring the Effects of Sexual Content in the Media. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation.
[37] Kaza, N. (2006). Adolescence, the Outbreaks Season. Tirane: Migeeralb.
[38] KFF (2000). Teens and Sex: The Role of Popular Television (Factsheet). Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation.
[39] Kunkel, D., Cope, K. M., & Biely, E. (1999). Sexual Messages on Television: Comparing Findings from Three Studies. Journal of Sex Research, 36, 230-236.
[40] Kunkel, D., Cope, K. M., & Colvin, C. (1996). Sexual Messages on Family Hour Television: Content and Context. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation.
[41] Kunkel, D., Cope-Farrar, K., Biely, E., Farinola, W. J. M., & Donnerstein, E. (2001). Sex on TV 2: A Biennial Report to the Kaiser Family Foundation. Menlo Park, CA: Kaiser Family Foundation.
[42] Nixon, H. (2000). Dawson’s Creek: Sex and Scheduling in a Global Phenomenon. English and Media Magazine, 42, 25-29.
[43] Nushi, P. (1999). General Psychology I. Prishtine.
[44] Recka, L. (2006). Development Psychology. Tirane: Libri Universitar.
[45] Rice, F. Ph., & Dolgin, K. G. (2005). The Adolescent Development, Relationships, and Culture (11th ed.). Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
[46] Sapolsky, B. S., & Taberlet, J. O. (1991). Sex in Prime-Time Television: 1979 versus 1989. Journal of Broadcasting and Electronic Media, 35, 505-516.
[47] Treise, D., & Gotthoffer, A. (2002). Stuff You Couldn’t Ask Your Parents: Teens Talking about Using Magazines for Sex Information. In J. D. Brown, J. R. Steele, & K. Walsh-Childers (Eds.), Sexual Teens, Sexual Media: Investigating Media’s Influence on Adolescent Sexuality (pp. 173-189). Mahwah, New Jersey and London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
[48] Walsh-Childers, K., Gotthoffer, A., & Lepre, C. R. (2002). From “Just the Facts” to “Downright Salacious”: Teens’ and Womens’ Magazine Coverage of Sex and Sexual Health. In J. D. Brown, J. R. Steele, & K. Walsh-Childers (Eds.), Sexual Teens, Sexual Media: Investigating Media’s Influence on Adolescent Sexuality (pp. 153-171). Mahwah, New Jersey and London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
[49] Ward, L. M., & Friedeman, K. (2006). Using TV as a Guide: Associations between Television Viewing and Adolescents’ Sexual Attitudes and Behavior. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 16, 133-156.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1532-7795.2006.00125.x
[50] Ward, L. M., & Rivadeneyra, R. (1999). Contributions of Entertainment Television to Adolescents’ Sexual Attitudes and Expectations: The Role of Viewing Amount versus Viewer Involvement. The Journal of Sex Research, 36, 237-249.

  
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