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A Philosophical Appraisal of the Concept of Common Origin and the Question of Racism

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DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2015.51003    3,708 Downloads   4,139 Views  

ABSTRACT

The quest for a definite answer to some certain ageless philosophical questions such as: What is man? What is his origin? What is his destiny? How is he like other beings in the universe, and how does he differ from them? These have up-till date; remain fundamental questions, which are begging for answers in all human societies. In spite of several attempts from the religious, scientific, cultural and sociological theories to explain the issue of common origin, the problem of racism with all its contradictions persists. This paper is to critically evaluate on one hand, the concept of common human origin, using the various theories to analyse the basis for its justification; on the other hand, examine the issues relating to racism, with the aim of arguing that the meaningfulness or meaninglessness of the universe must start from our understanding of human person and his existence. The philosophical method of conceptual clarification and critical analysis are employed to establish the view that man is the key to the understanding of the whole of reality. Thus, whatever disrespect human dignity regardless of colour, race or sex is to be absolutely rejected.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Aderibigbe, M. (2015) A Philosophical Appraisal of the Concept of Common Origin and the Question of Racism. Open Journal of Philosophy, 5, 25-30. doi: 10.4236/ojpp.2015.51003.

References

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[22] Corlett, A. (1998). Analyzing Racism. Public Affairs Quarterly, 12, 23-50.
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