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Protective Effect of Camellia sinensis on Methotrexate-Induced Small Intestinal Mucositis in Mice

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DOI: 10.4236/fns.2014.55052    4,041 Downloads   5,376 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Background: Green tea has been used as a daily beverage for several years. Anti-inflammatory effect of tea has also been depicted in different papers. Therefore we had set forward this study to examine the potential anti- inflammatory activity of green tea in small intestine mucositis experimental models. Aims: Evaluation of anti- inflammatory effects of green tea on mice. Materials and Methods: Green tea decoction (20%) was prepared by soaking 20 g of green tea in 100 ml boiled water separately, soaked for 2 minutes and thereafter filtered. In- flammatory activity was induced using methotrexate (2.75 g/kg/24 h sc), and a protecting effect of mucositis con- dition was investigated by vitamin E and Camellia sinensis decoction. Study Design: An experimental study was approved by an Animal Ethical Commitee. Results: Green tea decoction (20%) has shown significant anti-in- flammatory effects (65% and 70%) on methotrexate-induced acute mucositis model. In villous atrophy Green tea decoction (10% and 20%) has shown no protecting action at different intestinal segments. But at intestinal crypt hyperplasia, green tea decoction has shown 65.74%, as compared to mucositis group. An increase of apoptotic bodies were acchieved at MTX group, CS reduced this occurrence. Conclusion: Taken together, our data indi- cate that green tea (20%) has a potential anti-inflammatory compared vitamin E antioxidant action and cor- roborates with the current trend of tea being promoted as health drink. However more pharmacological and biochemical assays is necessary to elucidate mechanisms.

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Almeida, S. , Monteiro, M. , Lima, A. , Menezes, D. and Monteiro, S. (2014) Protective Effect of Camellia sinensis on Methotrexate-Induced Small Intestinal Mucositis in Mice. Food and Nutrition Sciences, 5, 443-448. doi: 10.4236/fns.2014.55052.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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