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The Research on Acupuncture Anesthesia Based on fMRI

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DOI: 10.4236/eng.2013.510B112    3,627 Downloads   4,474 Views  

ABSTRACT

Pain is one of the most important sensations in daily life,andthe traditional Chinese medicine such as acupuncture has shown great potential in pain relief. The principle research of acupuncture anesthesia has been the focus of modern science. In this paper the noninvasive brain imaging technique fMRI (functional magnetic resonanceimaging) was used. Eight volunteers were enrolled and received pain stimulation,andthe brain response under TEAS (transcutaneous elec-trical acupoint stimulation) and manual needle stimulation were observed. The research finds pain has specific sensation region and the acupuncture anesthesia is realized through modulating the corresponding brain function region, but the manual needle has wider brain response region than TEAS.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Tong, J. , Liu, J. , Lv, Y. and Chen, H. (2013) The Research on Acupuncture Anesthesia Based on fMRI. Engineering, 5, 545-548. doi: 10.4236/eng.2013.510B112.

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