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Patients with Dementia and Epilepsy: Does Family and Kinship Care Matters?

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DOI: 10.4236/aa.2013.32008    4,009 Downloads   8,038 Views  

ABSTRACT

Paper reports nine Case Studies each of epilepsy and dementia patients. Content analysis of family and kinship care in their families reveals significant issues of social stigma, marriage, school education, employment etc. among epilepsy patients as main concern while care of dementia patients in family concerns to spouse caring. It explores stigma affecting socio-cultural understanding of epilepsy and dementia. How these patients are cared within their family. Who care them most? It illuminates relevance of family and kinship care givers and recommend culturally appropriate interventions in community of such neuropsychiatric diseases.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Singh, R. , Sharma, V. & Talwar, U. (2013). Patients with Dementia and Epilepsy: Does Family and Kinship Care Matters?. Advances in Anthropology, 3, 55-64. doi: 10.4236/aa.2013.32008.

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