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Character and Culture: Towards a Man of Character—The Relevance of Traditional Igbo Family Values

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DOI: 10.4236/ojpp.2013.31A014    4,037 Downloads   5,553 Views  

ABSTRACT

Character and culture describe man both as an active and a passive agent in life. It is by being fashioned by culture that man cultivates character and by the use of this character so acquired that he develops and upgrades his culture; for culture is dynamic, that is elastic; as such there is need for eternal vigilance on the part of man to see his culture evolve and become better at every point in time. This can come about either spontaneously or through an agency; it is the duty of an agency to act upon what is given, required to produce a good result, in our instance to act on Igbo-African family values. This entails a dialogue of man and his milieu, for character grows form a healthy and salutary agent, so knowledge of, belief in and application of values is indeed a precondition.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Ogugua, P. (2013). Character and Culture: Towards a Man of Character—The Relevance of Traditional Igbo Family Values. Open Journal of Philosophy, 3, 86-92. doi: 10.4236/ojpp.2013.31A014.

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