A Novel Virtual Pharmacy Examination Format and Student Self-Perceptions in Making Nonprescription Product Recommendations

DOI: 10.4236/ce.2012.34086   PDF   HTML     4,712 Downloads   6,697 Views   Citations

Abstract

Determine the impact of the virtual pharmacy examination on student perceptions of confidence, competence, and comfort when recommending nonprescription products. METHODS: A pre-test post-test survey of student perceptions of their own confidence, competence and comfort following exposure to a “virtual pharmacy” examination was administered. Paired sample t-tests and independent samples t-tests were used for pre-post comparisons where appropriate. RESULTS: Analysis showed a pre-post mean increase of 1.25 on a 5-point scale (p < 0.001) for the 3-item subscale measuring perceived confidence in making nonprescription product recommendations. A single item for a pre-post comparison of perceived competence showed a mean increase of 1.45 on a 5-point scale (p < 0.001). Pre-post comparisons of self-reported comfort in making nonprescription recommendations showed a mean increase of 0.49 on a 5-point scale (p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: The virtual examination format improved student perceptions of their own confidence, competence and comfort in making nonprescription product recommendations.

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Hamilton, W. , Clark, B. , Padrón, V. , Kelly, A. , Hedlund, D. & Siracuse, M. (2012). A Novel Virtual Pharmacy Examination Format and Student Self-Perceptions in Making Nonprescription Product Recommendations. Creative Education, 3, 588-594. doi: 10.4236/ce.2012.34086.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

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