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Who Publishes What in the Journal of the Learning Sciences: Evidence for Possible Biases

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DOI: 10.4236/ce.2012.32040    6,191 Downloads   8,326 Views  
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ABSTRACT

A content analysis of the Journal of the Learning Sciences (JLS) was conducted for a 5-year period. Article topics, methodology, the names of the contributing authors, their academic ranks, affiliations, and geographical locations were coded to reveal trends in publication patterns. A questionnaire was sent to all authors in the relevant period to find out how they selected journals for submitting manuscripts. It was found that the active involvement of the JLS’s editor in the journal’s orientation correlated with the great importance that the JLS’s contributors gave to editorial considerations when selecting journals. A possible geographical bias was identified, and possible solutions were discussed.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Cheung, C. (2012). Who Publishes What in the Journal of the Learning Sciences: Evidence for Possible Biases. Creative Education, 3, 256-262. doi: 10.4236/ce.2012.32040.

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