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Response of Eight Sweet Maize (Zea mays L.) Hybrids to Saflufenacil Alone or Pre-Mixed with Dimethenamid-P

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DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2012.31009    4,454 Downloads   7,197 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Saflufenacil is a new herbicide for use in field maize (Zea mays L.) and other crops that may have potential for weed management in sweet maize. Tolerance of eight sweet maize hybrids to saflufenacil and saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-p applied preemergence (PRE) were studied at two Ontario locations in 2008 and 2009. Saflufenacil applied PRE at 75 and 150 g·ha–1 and saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-p (pre-mixed) applied PRE at 735 and 1470 g·ha–1 caused minimal (less than 5%) injury in Cahill, GH4927, Harvest Gold, Rocker, BSS5362, GG236, GG447, and GG763 sweet maize hybrids at 1 and 2 weeks after emergence (WAE). Saflufenacil or saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-p applied PRE did not reduce plant height, cob size, or yield of any of the sweet maize hybrids tested in this study. Based on these results, saflufenacil and saflufenacil plus dimethenamid-p pre-mixed applied PRE at the doses evaluated can be safely used for weed management in Cahill, GH4927, Harvest Gold, Rocker, BSS5362, GG236, GG447, and GG763 sweet maize under Ontario environmental conditions.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

D. Robinson, N. Soltani and P. Sikkema, "Response of Eight Sweet Maize (Zea mays L.) Hybrids to Saflufenacil Alone or Pre-Mixed with Dimethenamid-P," American Journal of Plant Sciences, Vol. 3 No. 1, 2012, pp. 96-101. doi: 10.4236/ajps.2012.31009.

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