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Factors Affecting South African District Officials’ Capacity to Provide Effective Teacher Support

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DOI: 10.4236/ce.2011.23031    5,317 Downloads   10,113 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The role of district officials as education reform agents is undeniable. Through perspectives analyses, we explore factors that affected the capacity of eight South African districts to provide effective teacher support during the last implementation of natural science reforms. We argue that district officials’ capability and reality issues are some of the factors that are likely to determine the success or failure of reforms. Further, they have the gravity to nullify the efforts to improve school performances. Lastly, we propose ways to bridge the gap between theory and practice and strategies to promote partnership between district officials and schools.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Bantwini, B. and Diko, N. (2011) Factors Affecting South African District Officials’ Capacity to Provide Effective Teacher Support. Creative Education, 2, 226-235. doi: 10.4236/ce.2011.23031.

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