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Calcined Clay Pozzolan as an Admixture to Mitigate the Alkali-Silica Reaction in Concrete

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DOI: 10.4236/msce.2014.25004    3,603 Downloads   5,533 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT


Calcined clay pozzolan has been used to replace varying portions of high alkali Portland limestone cement in order to study its effect on the alkali-silica reaction (ASR). Portland limestone cement used for the study had a total Na2Oeq of 4.32. Mortar-bar expansion decreased as pozzolan content in the cement increased. The highest expansion was recorded for reference bars with no pozzolan, reaching a maximum of 0.35% at 42 days whilst the expansion was reduced by between 42.5% and 107.8% at 14 days and between 9.4% and 16.4% at 84 days with increasing calcined clay pozzolan content. Mortar bars with 25% pozzolan were the least expansive recording expansion less than 0.1% at all test ages. X-ray diffractometry of the hydrated blended cement paste powders showed the formation of stable calcium silicates in increasing quantities whilst the presence of expansive alkali-silica gel, responsible for ASR expansion, decreased as pozzolan content increased. The study confirms that calcined clay pozzolan has an influence on ASR in mortar bars and causes a significant reduction in expansion at a replacement level of 25%.


Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Sarfo-Ansah, J. , Atiemo, E. , Boakye, K. , Adjei, D. and Adjaottor, A. (2014) Calcined Clay Pozzolan as an Admixture to Mitigate the Alkali-Silica Reaction in Concrete. Journal of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, 2, 20-26. doi: 10.4236/msce.2014.25004.

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