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Comparison of Soil Quality Improvement under Different Fallow Types on Dystric Nitosols Derived from Sand Stone in South Western Nigeria

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DOI: 10.4236/as.2014.511115    2,514 Downloads   3,030 Views Citations

ABSTRACT

The project was carried out to determine the effects of different fallow types on soil derived from sand stone of low nutrient status in south western Nigeria. The different fallow types include Leu-caena, elephant grass, guinea grass and secondary forest. Cultivated farm land was used to serve as control for comparison of soil quality improvement. Soil samples were collected in four replicates on each land cover type and analyzed for major physical and chemical parameters. The results show little fertility improvement for base saturation with 1.42 cmol/kg in Leucaena, 1.99 cmol/kg in secondary forest, 1.60 cmol/kg in guinea grass and in Elephant grass. Leucaena resulted to better soil quality than secondary forest especially in surface properties though not significantly different. Elephant grass and guinea grass also resulted to better Nitrogen content. Nitrogen content recorded in Leucaena was high with 0.20% - 0.25%. Guinea grass and elephant grass resulted to better soil quality in terms of nitrogen content [0.20% - 0.25%] than cultivated and secondary forest [0.07% - 0.11%] due to their yearly incorporation in to the soil by ploughing. The values of phosphorus were higher in Leucaena though not significant [6.46 mg/kg]. Low soil properties improvement is attributed to nutrient exploitation in Leucaena and secondary forest after a long period of fallow [20 years] while, nitrogen enrichment in the grasses is attributed to yearly tillage. Over all low to medium soil variability indicates that the soils could be managed as a unit for crop production.

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T. Ande, O. and Senjobi, B. (2014) Comparison of Soil Quality Improvement under Different Fallow Types on Dystric Nitosols Derived from Sand Stone in South Western Nigeria. Agricultural Sciences, 5, 1061-1068. doi: 10.4236/as.2014.511115.

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