Share This Article:

Humane Non-Human Primate Model of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Quantitative Analysis of Electromyographic Data

Abstract Full-Text HTML XML Download Download as PDF (Size:506KB) PP. 161-168
DOI: 10.4236/ojvm.2015.57022    3,896 Downloads   4,305 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

A valid non human primate model of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) is essential to evaluate and develop new treatments. In previous experiments, it has been demonstrated that a transmitter can be implanted in the macaque fasicularis monkey that measures electromyographic data from the musculature of the tail. As well, previous experiments have demonstrated that selective lesions can be created in the lower thoracic spinal cord that does not cause limb weakness and/or bowel dysfunction. The histopathological features of these lesions appear similar to human TSCI. This paper describes a method by which the EMG data can be transformed into a quantitative metric of volitional limb movement (“Q”). This metric permits an objective assessment of injury, natural recovery as well as potential efficacy of candidate treatments.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Seth, N. , Masood, F. , Sledge, J. , Graham, W. , Rosene, D. , Westmoreland, S. , Macri, S. , Sejdic, E. , Hoggatt, A. , Simmons, H. , Abdullah, H. and Nesathurai, S. (2015) Humane Non-Human Primate Model of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury: Quantitative Analysis of Electromyographic Data. Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine, 5, 161-168. doi: 10.4236/ojvm.2015.57022.

References

[1] Lee, B.B., Cripps, R.A., Fitzharris, M. and Wing, P.C. (2014) The Global Map for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Epidemiology: Update 2011, Global Incidence Rate. Spinal Cord, 52, 110-116.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sc.2012.158
[2] Nesathurai, S. (2013) The Rehabilitation of People with Spinal Cord Injury. 3rd Edition. Arbuckle Academic Publishers, Whittensville, Massachusetts.
[3] Nesathurai, S., et al. (2006) Model of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in Macaca Fascicularis: Similarity of Experimental Lesions Created by Epidural Catheter to Human Spinal Cord Injury. Journal of Medical Primatology, 35, 401-404.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0684.2006.00162.x
[4] Nesathurai, S., Andrew Graham, W., Edell, D.J., Rosene, D.L., Mansfield, K., Sehgal, P. and Sledge, J.B. (2006) Electromyographic Telemetry in the Development of Humane Primate Model of Spinal Cord Injury. Journal of Medical Primatology, 35, 397-400.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0684.2006.00161.x
[5] Graham, W.A., Rosene, D.L., Westmoreland, S., Miller, A., Sejdic, E. and Nesathurai, S. (2013) Humane Non-Human Primate Model of Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Utilizing Electromyography as a Measure of Impairment and Recovery. Open Journal of Veterinary Medicine, 3, 86-89.
http://dx.doi.org/10.4236/ojvm.2013.31014
[6] Courtine, G., Bunge, M.B., Fawcett, J.W., et al. (2007) Can Experiments in Nonhuman Primates Expedite the Translation of Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury in Humans? Nature Medicine, 13, 561-566.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nm1595
[7] Sledge, J., Graham, W.A., Westmoreland, S., Sejdic, E., Miller, A., Hoggatt, A. and Nesathurai, S. (2013) Spinal Cord Injury Models in Non Human Primates: Are Lesions Created by Sharp Instruments Relevant to Human Injuries? Medical Hypotheses, 81, 747-748.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mehy.2013.07.040
[8] Neumann, D.A. (2013) Kinesiology of the Kinesiology of the Musculoskeletal System: Foundations for Rehabilitation. Elsevier Health Sciences, St. Louis.
[9] Ramsey, F. and Schafer, D. (2012) The Statistical Sleuth: A Course in Methods of Data Analysis. 2nd Edition, Wadsworth Group, Pacific Grove.

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2018 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.