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Interaction between Mental Rotation and Manual Rotation with and without Motor Planning

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DOI: 10.4236/psych.2015.69106    2,675 Downloads   3,098 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Two experiments involving mental rotation with two types of manual rotation were run. In Exp 1, participants had to perform the mental rotation task with active hand movement using a rotating device that did not move automatically. In Exp 2, participants had to perform the mental rotation with passive hand movement using an automatically rotating device. The interaction effect between mental and manual rotation was observed only in the former case. These opposing results indicate that it is motor planning associated only with active movement that plays an important role in the interaction between mental and manual rotation and not the proprioceptive/kinesthetic feedback caused by the manual rotation itself.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Nishihara, S. , Imai, F. , Fujiki, A. and Majima, Y. (2015) Interaction between Mental Rotation and Manual Rotation with and without Motor Planning. Psychology, 6, 1086-1095. doi: 10.4236/psych.2015.69106.

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