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Fiber Residues from Canavalia ensiformis L. Seeds with Potential Use in Food Industry

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DOI: 10.4236/as.2014.513131    2,214 Downloads   2,692 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The objective of this research was to determine the physicochemical characteristics of fiber residues from Jack bean (Canavalia ensiformis L.) obtained by two technological processes. The proximal composition of the fiber residues from Canavalia ensiformis registered values of moisture, ash, protein, fat, fiber and nitrogen-free extract (NFE) of 7.14%, 3.17%, 9.14%, 1.34%,  23.84% and 62.51% for residue A and 4.74%, 2.68%, 7.73%, 1.39%, 23.76% and 64.44% for residue B. Total dietary fiber (TDF) contents in the fiber residues were 47.06 (Residue A) and 54.96 (Residue B) g/100g sample, with most of this content represented by insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) 45.46 g/100g sample in Residue A and 52.75 g/100g of sample in Residue B. The remainder was constituted by soluble dietary fiber (SDF). The neutral detergent fiber (NDF) content was slightly higher in residue B (41.8 g/100g sample). Acid detergent fiber (ADF) that includes principally cellulose, lignin and cutin, and acid detergent lignin (ADL) that include lignin and cutin were higher in residue B (32.5 g/100g sample) and similar for both residues (1.0 (A) and 1.2 (B) g/100g sample), respectively. Resistant starch (RS) was higher in residue B (0.607%) than in residue A (0.358%). No statistical difference (p > 0.05) was registered in the tannins content of both residues. However, the phytates content was higher in the fiber residue obtained by the fists technological process (A residue). In vitro digestibility was higher in residue A (85.81%) than that in B residue (81.51%). The results of the present study suggest the potential use of C. ensiformis fiber residues as a functional ingredient in foods, especially in the development of reduced calorie food and dietary fiber enriched foods.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Segura-Campos, M. , Manrique-Reynoso, L. , Chel-Guerrero, L. and Betancur-Ancona, D. (2014) Fiber Residues from Canavalia ensiformis L. Seeds with Potential Use in Food Industry. Agricultural Sciences, 5, 1227-1236. doi: 10.4236/as.2014.513131.

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