Share This Article:

The Effect of Photon Flux Density and Lighting Period on Growth, Flowering, Powdery Mildew and Water Relations of Miniature Roses

Full-Text HTML XML Download Download as PDF (Size:567KB) PP. 1813-1818
DOI: 10.4236/ajps.2014.513194    3,077 Downloads   4,074 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Miniature roses (Rosa sp.) were grown at 100 and 150 μmol m-2·s-1 photon flux densities (PFD) with 16, 20 and 24 h·day-1 lighting periods (LP) in a greenhouse compartment in midwinter at latitude 59° north. The study included 10 different treatments and six rose cultivars, altogether 900 plants. The 16 and 20 h LP were applied with or without a dark period of 8 and 4 h·day-1, respectively, by timing the LP in relation to daylight that lasted for 7 - 8 h. Number of days until flowering decreased with an increase in PFD and in LP up to 24 day-1 and was unaffected by the timing of the 16 and 20 h·day-1 LP. Number of flowers and plant dry weight increased 20% to 30% by increasing the PFD. Plant dry weight increased by increasing the LP from 16 to 20 h·day-1 (about 25%), but no effect was found with a further increase to 24 h·day-1. Mean growth rate until flowering increased 30% to 40% by increasing the PFD or by increasing the LP from 16 to 20 h day-1, while little effect was found by a further increase to 24 h·day-1. Increasing the photosynthetic active radiation (PAR) by increasing the LP from 16 to 20 h·day-1 increased the growth rate more than increasing the PFD did. Three of the cultivars were tested for water loss after the detachment of some leaves. Leaves that had developed without a dark period showed a considerably higher water loss than the treatments that included a dark period of 4 or 8 h·day-1. The keeping quality at indoor conditions, however, was unaffected by the treatment due to sufficient watering. Powdery mildew developed significantly more on plants grown with a dark period of 8 h as compared with the other treatments. It was concluded that 20 h·day-1 LP including a dark period of 4 h·day-1 and a PFD of at least 150 μmol·m-2·s-1 should be applied to miniature roses during the winter months in order to effectively produce miniature pot roses with a high quality.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Mortensen, L. (2014) The Effect of Photon Flux Density and Lighting Period on Growth, Flowering, Powdery Mildew and Water Relations of Miniature Roses. American Journal of Plant Sciences, 5, 1813-1818. doi: 10.4236/ajps.2014.513194.

References

[1] Mortensen, L.M. and Ulsaker, R. (1985) Effect of CO2 Concentration and Light Levels on Growth, Flowering and Photosynthesis of Begonia x hiemalis Fotsch. Scientia Horticulturae, 27, 133-141.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0304-4238(85)90063-9
[2] Gislerød, H.R., Eidsten, I.M. and Mortensen, L.M. (1989) The Interaction of Daily Lighting Period and Light Intensity on Growth of Some Greenhouse Plants. Scientia Horticulturae, 38, 295-304.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0304-4238(89)90077-0
[3] Mortensen, L.M. and Grimstad, S.O. (1990) The Effect of Lighting Period and Photon Flux Density on Growth of Six Foliage Plants. Scientia Horticulturae, 41, 337-342. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0304-4238(90)90114-T
[4] Mortensen, L.M. (1991) Effect of Temperature, Light and CO2 Level on Growth and Flowering of Miniature Roses. Norwegian Journal of Agricultural Sciences, 5, 295-300.
[5] Mortensen, L.M. and Fjeld, T. (1998) Effects of Air Humidity, Lighting Period and Lamp Type on Growth and Vase Life of Roses. Scientia Horticulturae, 73, 229-237. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0304-4238(98)00075-2
[6] Mortensen, L.M. and Gislerød, H.R. (1999) Influence of Air Humidity and Lighting Period on Growth, Vase Life and Water Relations of 14 Rose Cultivars. Scientia Horticulturae, 82, 289-298.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0304-4238(99)00062-
[7] Mortensen, L.M., Pettersen, R.I. and Gislerød, H.R. (2007) Air Humidity Variation and Control of Vase Life and Powdery Mildew in Cut Roses under Continuous Lighting. European Journal of Horticultural Science, 72, 255-259.
[8] Marcelis, L.F.M., Brockhuijsen, A.G.M., Meinen, E., Nijs, E.M.F.M. and Raaphorst, M.G.M. (2006) Quantification of the Growth Response to Light Quantity of Greenhouse Crops. Acta Horticulturae, 711, 97-103.
[9] Mortensen, L.M. (2004) Growth and Light Utilization of Pot Plants at Variable Day-to-Day Irradiances. Journal of Horticultural Science, 69, 89-95.
[10] Mortensen, L.M. (2014) The Effect of Wide-Range Photosynthetic Active Radiations on Photosynthesis, Growth and Flowering of Rosa sp. and Kalanchoe blossfeldiana. American Journal of Plant Science, 5, 1489-1498.
[11] Warner, R.M. and Erwin, J.E. (2005) Prolonged High Temperature Exposure and Daily Light Integral Impact Growth and Flowering of Five Herbaceous Ornamental Species. Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, 130, 283-288.
[12] Moccaldi, L.A. and Runkle, E.S. (2007) Modelling the Effect of Temperature and Photosynthetic Daily Light Integral on Growth and Flowering of Salvia splendens and Tagetes patula. Journal of the American Society for Horticultural Science, 132, 283-288.
[13] Blanchard, M.G., Runkle, E.S. and Fisher, P.R. (2011) Modeling Plant Morphology and Development of Petunia in Response to Temperature and Photosynthetic Light Integral. Scientia Horticulturae, 129, 313-320.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scienta.2011.03.044
[14] Mortensen, L.M., Toppe, B. and Gislerød, H.R. (2006) Influence of Carbon Dioxide Concentration and Diurnal Temperature Variation on Growth, Powdery Mildew and Quality of Cut Roses. European Journal of Horticultural Science, 71, 217-221.

  
comments powered by Disqus

Copyright © 2018 by authors and Scientific Research Publishing Inc.

Creative Commons License

This work and the related PDF file are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.