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Prediction of CO2 and H2S Emissions from Wastewater Wet Wells

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DOI: 10.4236/gep.2014.22019    5,373 Downloads   6,379 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

The transportation of wastewater through sewer networks can cause potential problems due to the formation of lethal gases such as ammonia, carbon dioxide, hydrogen sulphide and methane. As a result, they can cause irritating, toxic, and microbial induced corrosion. The true depth of these problems can be measured by measuring the emission of such lethal gasses in the sewer atmosphere. The amount of gases released from such sewer networks has to be controlled. In this paper, we present a simple experimental methodology used to determine the emissions of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) and Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) using Landtec GEM-2000 plus multi-gas analyser from wastewater wet wells.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Kura, B. , Kura, B. , Iyer, A. and Ajdari, E. (2014) Prediction of CO2 and H2S Emissions from Wastewater Wet Wells. Journal of Geoscience and Environment Protection, 2, 134-142. doi: 10.4236/gep.2014.22019.

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