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Hemoglobin concentration of intestinal parasites infested children in Okada, Edo state, Nigeria

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DOI: 10.4236/ojepi.2013.34022    3,177 Downloads   4,960 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Anemia in children is defined by the World Health Organization as a hemoglobin concentration below 11 g/dl for children (0.5-5.0 yrs) and12 g/dl for teens (12-15 yrs). 4 ml of venous blood sample was collected in EDTA container. Of the total of three hundred and thirty four (334) subjects, one hundred and fifty two (152) were Females and one hundred and eighty two (182) were Males. Intestinal parasite assessment was done by Direct Smear technique and Formol-Ether concentration methods. Hemoglobin concentration was analyzed using Cyanmethaemoglobin method. Thirty (30) subjects were infested with Ascaris lumbricoides (single infestation), Ninety Five (95) subjects were infested with Ascaris lumbricoides and Hookworm (Double infestation) and Forty Two (42) subjects were infested with Ascaris lumbricoides, Hookworm, Entamoeba histolytica and Trichuris trichiura (Multiple infestation). The Mean ± Standard Deviation of Hemoglobin concentration of the various infestation types against the control subject shows a statistically significant decrease (P < 0.05). Our data confirm that intestinal parasites are associated with anemia irrespective of gender and age in children.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Ehiaghe, A. , Tatfeng, Y. , Ehiaghe, J. and Osaretin, U. (2013) Hemoglobin concentration of intestinal parasites infested children in Okada, Edo state, Nigeria. Open Journal of Epidemiology, 3, 149-152. doi: 10.4236/ojepi.2013.34022.

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