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Textual Metaphor from the Non-Finite Clausal Perspective

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DOI: 10.4236/ojml.2013.34039    5,813 Downloads   8,613 Views   Citations
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ABSTRACT

Grammatical metaphor in the Hallidayan sense only comprises ideational and interpersonal metaphors, while Martin and others propose the inclusion of textual metaphor. Based on metafunctions of Systemic Functional Linguistics, this paper analyzes the current discussions of textual metaphor, pointing out that some textual metaphors by Martin and others are in essence representations of ideational and interpersonal metaphors in text, and some are not in accordance with the principles of grammatical metaphor. Four types of textual metaphor with double functions are proposed from the perspective of non-finite clause relators; they are (1) elaborative non-finite clauses, (2) extensive and enhancing non-finite clauses without relators, (3) extensive and enhancing non-finite clauses with prepositions as relators, and (4) enhancing non-finite clauses with prepositionalized non-finite verbs.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

He, Q. (2013). Textual Metaphor from the Non-Finite Clausal Perspective. Open Journal of Modern Linguistics, 3, 308-313. doi: 10.4236/ojml.2013.34039.

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