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Assessment of the effectiveness of standardized infusion devices for healthcare management

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DOI: 10.4236/health.2011.32017    4,732 Downloads   8,196 Views  

ABSTRACT

Since standardization is an important safety measure in healthcare systems, it is essential to systematically assess the effects of introducing new and increasingly complex medical equip-ment, such as infusion devices. In this study, we compared the effects of standardized polyvinyl chloride (PVC)-free closed-system integrated infusion devices with conventional infusion de-vices. Specifically, we assessed the safety, work efficiency, user-friendliness, and cost effec-tiveness of these devices. Compared with con-ventional infusion devices, integrated PVC-free infusion devices were more expensive to pur-chase and dispose, but were safer and more user-friendly and efficient. Although it would be preferable to use standardized infusion devices in all hospital departments, their cost may limit their application to departments that use high-risk treatments, where they would be most beneficial.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Sugita, S. , Aida, H. , Okada, A. and Kobayashi, H. (2011) Assessment of the effectiveness of standardized infusion devices for healthcare management. Health, 3, 93-98. doi: 10.4236/health.2011.32017.

References

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