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Pulse Vaccination Strategy in an Epidemic Model with Two Susceptible Subclasses and Time Delay

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DOI: 10.4236/am.2011.21007    3,790 Downloads   7,923 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

In this paper, an impulsive epidemic model with time delay is proposed, which susceptible population is divided into two groups: high risk susceptibles and non-high risk susceptibles. We introduce two thresholds R1, R2 and demonstrate that the disease will be extinct if R1<1 and persistent if R2 >1 . Our results show that larger pulse vaccination rates or a shorter the period of pulsing will lead to the eradication of the disease. The conclusions are confirmed by numerical simulations.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

Y. Luo, S. Gao and S. Yan, "Pulse Vaccination Strategy in an Epidemic Model with Two Susceptible Subclasses and Time Delay," Applied Mathematics, Vol. 2 No. 1, 2011, pp. 57-63. doi: 10.4236/am.2011.21007.

References

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