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Aeromonas hydrophila Septic Arthritis in a Patient Infected with HIV*

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DOI: 10.4236/ojra.2013.33025    3,416 Downloads   4,890 Views   Citations

ABSTRACT

Septic arthritis is a medical emergency. The causative organisms are primarily staphylococcus and streptococcus. Aeromonas hydrophila septic arthritis seems to be rare. We report one case observed in a 58-year-old patient infected with HIV serotype 1 and treated by zidovudine, lamivudine and nevirapine. CD4 count was 413 cells per microliter and viral load undetectable. Two blood cultures were A. hydrophila positive. The evolution was favorable after treatment by ceftriaxone and gentamicin.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

D. Ouédraogo, J. Zabsonré, H. Tiéno, I. Diallo, A. Bagbila and J. Drabo, "Aeromonas hydrophila Septic Arthritis in a Patient Infected with HIV*," Open Journal of Rheumatology and Autoimmune Diseases, Vol. 3 No. 3, 2013, pp. 165-166. doi: 10.4236/ojra.2013.33025.

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