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Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Surface Coating Facilities: Characterization of Facilities, Estimation of Emission Rates, and Dispersion Modeling of Off-Site Impacts

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DOI: 10.4236/jep.2013.48A1015    3,620 Downloads   5,273 Views  

ABSTRACT

Surface coating facilities are major sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in urban areas. These VOCs can contribute to ground-level ozone formation, and many are hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), including xylene, ethylbenzene, and toluene. This project was conducted in order to provide information for updating the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ), USA, permit by rule for Surface Coating Facilities. Project objectives were: 1) To develop a database of information regarding surface coating facilities in Texas; 2) To estimate maximum emission rates for various VOC species from surface coating facilities in Texas; 3) To conduct dispersion modeling to estimate off-site impacts from surface coating facilities. The database was developed using 286 TCEQ permit files authorizing surface coating facilities in Texas during 2006 and 2007. The database was designed to include information important for estimating emission rates, and for using as inputs to the dispersion model. Hourly and annual emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter (PM), and exempt solvents (ES) were calculated for each permitted entity/ company in the database, according to equations given by TCEQ. Dispersion modeling was then conducted for 3 facility configurations (worst-case stack height, good practice stack height, and fugitive emissions), for urban and rural dispersion parameters, for 8-hour and 24-hour operating scenarios, and for 1-hour, 24-hour, and annual averaging times, for a total of 36 scenarios. The highest modeled concentrations were for the worst-case stack height, rural dispersion parameters, 24-hour operation scenario, and 1-hour averaging time. 108 specific chemical species, which are components of surface coatings, were identified as candidates for further health impacts review.

Conflicts of Interest

The authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Cite this paper

A. Athappan, S. Sumitsawan, R. Gangupomu, K. Kositkanawuth, P. Parikh, B. Afotey, N. Sule, S. Kalidindi, M. Sattler and Y. Weatherton, "Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Surface Coating Facilities: Characterization of Facilities, Estimation of Emission Rates, and Dispersion Modeling of Off-Site Impacts," Journal of Environmental Protection, Vol. 4 No. 8A, 2013, pp. 123-141. doi: 10.4236/jep.2013.48A1015.

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